Another Brooklyn

Another Brooklyn

Book - 2016
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For August, running into a long-ago friend sets in motion resonant memories and transports her to a time and a place she thought she had mislaid: 1970s Brooklyn, where friendship was everything. August, Sylvia, Angela, and Gigi shared confidences as they ambled their neighborhood streets, a place where the girls believed that they were amazingly beautiful, brilliantly talented, with a future that belonged to them. But beneath the hopeful promise there was another Brooklyn, a dangerous place where grown men reached for innocent girls in dark hallways, where mothers disappeared, where fathers found religion, and where madness was a mere sunset away. Woodson heartbreakingly illuminates the formative period when a child meets adulthood -- when precious innocence meets the all-too-real perils of growing up. -- from book jacket.
Publisher: New York, NY : Amistad, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, c2016
ISBN: 9780062359995
9780062359988
0062359983
Branch Call Number: FIC Wood
Characteristics: 175 pages ; 21 cm

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a
Aquanblue
Mar 29, 2018

A great coming of age book. Every girl should read this book and experience the stories of these girls' friendship. Especially in this age when mothers and daughters don't always talk about "everything"

k
KingOscarOne
Mar 03, 2018

This reads like notes for a work the author never got around to completing. Generic, faceless characters and inarticulately summarized experiences seem to be waiting for real work and attention. It looks like many critics gave Woodson a pass, as if lack of detail and coherence add up to a “haunting” style.

ArapahoeAnnaL Feb 14, 2018

A moving, beautifully written book. Starred reviews from Booklist, Publishers Weekly, Kirkus, and School Library Journal.

m
MelissaBee
Jan 31, 2018

" I know now that what is tragic isn't the moment. It is the memory."

Reading "Another Brooklyn" has that fleeting quality of wonder, concern, and intimacy, you might feel when protectively holding a stunned bird in your cupped hands as its heart beats wildly, reverberating throughout your whole body, before it bursts into flight and freedom, leaving you a breathless observer of a brief moment in time.

This lyrical novella will appeal to a reader who loves experiencing a book as more than a story, as its writing is poetic and reflective, a meditation almost. Indeed, some may find the book frustrating as it only offers a brief, free-form, glimpse into the tender and immediate thoughts of a young woman of color and her friends as they navigate the world of "girl" in 1970s Bushwick.

I found the book to be quite affecting, leaving me with a sense of gratitude for such an intimate portrait of becoming a woman, forged somewhere between the crush of the world and the embrace of those who love you. The tragedy may indeed be in the memory, not the moment, but so is the healing as we look back and come to understand ourselves more fully through our own stories, our own words.

A story about mothers, loss, memory, and growing up. The novel's language is poetic as is the style. Some chapters dance around, touching on different bits and pieces of the story. Eventually those bits and pieces come together to form a whole picture. At times it was difficult to follow, and as a reader I tend to prefer more linear stories. Still this story was almost musical, and very real.

e
Einer2
Sep 10, 2017

I'm always drawn to books that take place in Brooklyn and this one did not disappoint. It was beautifully written. Should be a must read for young women and men.

Chapel_Hill_KatieJ Jul 12, 2017

This is a beautiful book. August and her three closest friends grow up in a vibrant Brooklyn, but there is also the other Brooklyn with criminal activity, teenage pregnancies, abusive parents, troubled veterans, and assault. August’s father tries to shield her and her brother from this, by not letting them out of the apartment. Of course, eventually they have to venture out in the world. This is a beautiful, lyrical book. My only complaint is that it’s sometimes hard to keep track of the time jumps.

s
Starpoem
Jun 26, 2017

What I liked: This was a quick read, and it was very poetically written. It was dream-like and impressionistic.

What I disliked: The main character did not seem to change over the course of the book--she started out sad, she ended up still sad, and she seemed determined to stay sad. The supporting characters lacked dimension and therefore seemed unrealistic.

If you are looking for a book about childhood friendships and loss, I recommend The False Friend by Myla Goldberg over Another Brooklyn.

TSCPL_Miranda May 26, 2017

I was pulled into this story immediately, and it was hard to put it down. Poetic, highly sensory writing. It transported me to 70s Brooklyn, but also felt true to my experience of growing up girl in another time and place. 4 stars instead of 5 because I wanted it to dig deeper--I finished the book with unanswered questions and didn't get a good feeling of closure.

MsDouglas_O Apr 13, 2017

This book was a great read. J. Woodson has a way of telling you a story and keeping you engaged. Loved it.

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MelissaBee
Jan 31, 2018

MelissaBee thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

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