Ancillary Sword

Ancillary Sword

eBook - 2014
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Publisher: New York, NY : Orbit, 2014
ISBN: 9780316402743
0316402745
Characteristics: 1 online resource

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IndyPL_SteveB Jul 02, 2019

This is a top-notch science fiction novel and a sequel to the Hugo and Nebula winner, *Ancillary Justice*. These are some of the most creative science fiction books ever written, unique in several ways.

In *Ancillary Justice*, the reader discovered that not only battleship AIs have a connected existence through the minds of slaves, but so does the Emperor of the Radchaai. She/he has been in existence for two millennia, though thousands of mind-connected clones who act as her representatives throughout the parts of the galaxy she controls. And some of these versions of the Emperor have begun to rebel against the others. Now, in *Ancillary Sword,* Breq has aided one version of the Emperor and is sent to protect Athoek Station, a space station above a sensitive planetary system which could be under threat of invasion. A murder investigation may bring an alien race into the war, making for complete unpredictability.

This is not a book with a lot of traditional “action” but the political action is quite intense. The telling is tricky because Breq still has the software and hardware in her head that allows her to communicate with her current Ship and with the Station’s AI, so she can see more of what is going on than anyone else. Which means that we, the readers, are privilege to (or *subjected* to, depending on your ability to handle it) a unique style of floating viewpoints. Leckie’s books challenge you and open you up to new ways of looking at the world.

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wildfireheart
Mar 15, 2019

#2- The Ancillary series

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Barbdesign
Sep 25, 2018

This book broke down walls in my mind that I didn't know existed, and creates an even stronger fabric in the ongoing tapestry of gender equality. Brilliantly portrays a more fully developed artificially intelligent being, while probing what it means to be human.

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captbligh
Jul 19, 2017

Passable only as a follow-on to the excellent Ancillary Justice.

d
DuncanButcher
Jun 29, 2017

I am enjoying this series. Some people are going to get their noses out of joint over the way the author conveys the lack of gendered pronouns in the language the characters use, but to do so is to miss out on an excellent new science fiction universe. The plot is good, although it would be interesting to see the protagonist cope with more internal conflict. As it is, I like where this series has gone, and looks like it is going.

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yonah9
Nov 13, 2016

This book has a lighter atmosphere than the prequel (I didn't cry this time) but it's still incredibly good. I love the asexual/aromantic representation.

KateHillier Sep 20, 2016

Ancillary Justice is a hard act to follow so this can't help but be lesser than that. That being said I still enjoyed myself despite my not being entirely sure where the plot is going here. The characters are interesting, how they interact with each other is interesting, and Breq herself continues to be fascinating. All that helps you forgive the frequent tea ceremonies and concerns about dishes and the like. Also interesting but differently so. Curious to see how this all ends up in the finale

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Chapel_Hill_KenMc
Jul 01, 2015

Though this second book in Leckie's space opera trilogy lacks the plot momentum of the first book, it still features the wonderfully complex character construction that seems to be this author's hallmark. You can also rely on Leckie to expose social and racial (or, rather, inter-species) injustices and draw parallels between her artfully-constructed societies and our own. Recommended for anyone who likes compelling characters in exotic settings, but read the first book before finding this one.

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d050387321
Jun 11, 2015

Great sequel. Looking forward to the next one.

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JLMason
Mar 02, 2015

What a pleasure to be back in head of the protagonist, Breq. I didn't realize how much I liked this Mr. Spock-like logical character until I picked up Book 2. Like Spock her emotions are contained, but still present and driving her sense of obligation. The unpleasant, colonial aspects of Radchaai "civilization" are explored in this book, which sets up the conditions for the pending conflict that will undoubtedly be played out in Book 3.

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