Grendel

Grendel

Book - 1971
Average Rating:
4
Rate this:
The first and most terrifying monster in English literature, from the great early epic Beowulf, tells his side of the story.
Publisher: New York : Vintage Books, c1971
ISBN: 9780679723110
0679723110
Branch Call Number: FIC Gard
Characteristics: 174 p. : ill. ; 21 cm

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

t
Telingro
Sep 25, 2017

Oh I absolutely LOVED this take on a new perspective... the monster, and the monsters... who's the true monster? I read Beowulf in the 10th grade or so, and found it brutal. The whole "hero's archetype" thing. Well, this is rather horrifying, but one begins to sympathize and truly see through Grendel's eyes. His flaws, Beowulf's flaws, the world and society and their flaws. But not the book itself-- this book is great!

FederalWayEdna Jun 19, 2015

Not having read Beowulf, I didn't have that connection that friends of mine relayed to me about this novel but, I do feel it's a good YA discussion book because teens can readily relate to the feeling of being an outsider looking in and trying to understand (and wishing) how to be included in a larger (popular) group.

eferry Oct 24, 2014

While the description on our site calls Grendel merely a re-telling of the story "Beowulf," it's a lot more.

Grendel focuses on the titular character, the monster Grendel, as he lives, plots, and imagines in his life in Denmark in the early years AD. Most of the story is written using modern terms (sometimes in a hilariously anachronistic way) and is much more accessible than the original epic.

It's a short read, but (as any high-schooler might tell you) there are innumerable ways to interpret Grendel and his way of thinking.

Try it out!

MeeisLee Nov 09, 2011

"Grendel is a beautiful and heartbreaking modern retelling of the Beowulf epic from the point of view of the monster, Grendel, the villain of the 8th-century Anglo-Saxon epic." -Amazon.com

___

I found Grendel to be an interesting take on the Beowulf epic. I actually read Grendel before reading Beowulf, and it changed how I viewed the original epic. Grendel, a monster, reflects some of the confusion and questioning present in humans. The setting is in 4th century AD in Denmark but his language is obviously modern. I don't think it takes away from the story as I found the old English in Beowulf overbearing and confusing.

Age

Add Age Suitability

There are no ages for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Recommendations

Subject Headings

  Loading...
PLYMC owns a similar edition of this title.

View originally-listed edition

Report edition-matching error

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top